Search
Keywords: Category: Scope:  
Your present location:Home >> Fitness >> Tibial Acceleration and Muscle Activation During Overground and Motorised Treadmill

Font Size:big  middle  small

Tibial Acceleration and Muscle Activation During Overground and Motorised Treadmill

Writer:realleaderfitnessDate:2017-2-8 09:21:44
To examine tibial acceleration and muscle activation during overground (OG), motorised treadmill (MT) and non-motorised treadmill conditions when walking, jogging and running at matched velocities.
Methods: An accelerometer recorded acceleration at the mid-tibia and surface EMG electrodes recorded rectus femoris (RF), semitendinosus (ST), tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SL) muscle activation during OG, MT and non-motorised treadmill locomotion whilst walking, jogging and running.
Results: The non-motorised treadmill produced large reductions in tibial acceleration when compared with OG and MT conditions across walking, jogging and running conditions. RF EMG was small‐moderately higher in the non-motorised treadmill condition when compared with the OG and MT conditions across walking, jogging and running conditions. ST EMG showed large and very large increases in the non-motorised treadmill when compared to OG and MT conditions during walking whilst SL EMG found large increases on the non-motorised treadmill when compared to OG and MT conditions during running. The non-motorised treadmill condition generated very large increases in step frequency when compared to OG and MT conditions during walking, with large and very large decreases during jogging and very large decreases during running.
Conclusions: The non-motorised treadmill generates large reductions in tibial acceleration, moderate to very large increases in muscular activation and large to very large decreases in cycle time when compared to OG and MT locomotion. Whilst this may decrease the osteogenic potential of non-motorised treadmill locomotion, there may be uses for NMTs during rehabilitation for lower limb injuries.

 

This entry was posted on February 8, 2017 Fitness
To examine tibial acceleration and muscle activation during overground (OG), motorised treadmill (MT) and non-motorised treadmill conditions when walking, jogging and running at matched velocities.
Methods: An accelerometer recorded acceleration at the mid-tibia and surface EMG electrodes recorded rectus femoris (RF), semitendinosus (ST), tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SL) muscle activation during OG, MT and non-motorised treadmill locomotion whilst walking, jogging and running.
Results: The non-motorised treadmill produced large reductions in tibial acceleration when compared with OG and MT conditions across walking, jogging and running conditions. RF EMG was small‐moderately higher in the non-motorised treadmill condition when compared with the OG and MT conditions across walking, jogging and running conditions. ST EMG showed large and very large increases in the non-motorised treadmill when compared to OG and MT conditions during walking whilst SL EMG found large increases on the non-motorised treadmill when compared to OG and MT conditions during running. The non-motorised treadmill condition generated very large increases in step frequency when compared to OG and MT conditions during walking, with large and very large decreases during jogging and very large decreases during running.
Conclusions: The non-motorised treadmill generates large reductions in tibial acceleration, moderate to very large increases in muscular activation and large to very large decreases in cycle time when compared to OG and MT locomotion. Whilst this may decrease the osteogenic potential of non-motorised treadmill locomotion, there may be uses for NMTs during rehabilitation for lower limb injuries.
This entry was posted on February 8, 2017 Fitness
To examine tibial acceleration and muscle activation during overground (OG), motorised treadmill (MT) and non-motorised treadmill conditions when walking, jogging and running at matched velocities.
Methods: An accelerometer recorded acceleration at the mid-tibia and surface EMG electrodes recorded rectus femoris (RF), semitendinosus (ST), tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SL) muscle activation during OG, MT and non-motorised treadmill locomotion whilst walking, jogging and running.
Results: The non-motorised treadmill produced large reductions in tibial acceleration when compared with OG and MT conditions across walking, jogging and running conditions. RF EMG was small‐moderately higher in the non-motorised treadmill condition when compared with the OG and MT conditions across walking, jogging and running conditions. ST EMG showed large and very large increases in the non-motorised treadmill when compared to OG and MT conditions during walking whilst SL EMG found large increases on the non-motorised treadmill when compared to OG and MT conditions during running. The non-motorised treadmill condition generated very large increases in step frequency when compared to OG and MT conditions during walking, with large and very large decreases during jogging and very large decreases during running.
Conclusions: The non-motorised treadmill generates large reductions in tibial acceleration, moderate to very large increases in muscular activation and large to very large decreases in cycle time when compared to OG and MT locomotion. Whilst this may decrease the osteogenic potential of non-motorised treadmill locomotion, there may be uses for NMTs during rehabilitation for lower limb injuries.
This entry was posted on February 8, 2017 Fitness